Chocolate

GENERAL INFO

Candy bars, milk shakes, cookies, flavored coffee - even cereal and medicine! Chocolate is a key ingredient in many foods. It ranks as the favorite flavor of most Americans. Yet, few of us know the unique origins of this popular treat. [3]
Chocolate is a mild stimulant to humans mainly due to the presence of theobromine. It is much more potent for horses, and its use in horse racing is prohibited. [2]
You may read that chocolate is an aphrodisiac based on studies from reputable universities. [4]
While there is no firm proof that chocolate is indeed an aphrodisiac, a gift of chocolate is a familiar courtship ritual. [2]
Chocolate is a food that contains a range of nutrients—including not only fats and sugar, but also other carbohydrates and proteins. Chocolate contains small quantities of salts of metals such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, and iron; the vitamin riboflavin; the stimulant caffeine; and water. [5]
In a controlled experiment comparing 20 different people, researchers found that dark chocolate was a significant factor in lowering blood pressure, while white chocolate white chocolate was not. The key ingredient thought to cause this phenomenon is flavonoids. [1]
1/3 is consumed by the Spaniards. As cocoa plantations spread to the tropics in both hemispheres by the 19th century, the increased production lowered the price of the cocoa beans and chocolate became a popular and affordable beverage. [4]
The health benefits of dark chocolate were discovered centuries ago by the Aztecs, a Mexican empire that thrived in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. [1]
The three main varieties of cacao beans used in chocolate are criollo, forastero and trinitario. [2]
Romantic lore commonly identifies chocolate as an aphrodisiac. The reputed aphrodisiac qualities of chocolate are most often associated with the simple sensual pleasure of its consumption. It has been suggested that theobromine and other chemicals found in chocolate, most notably phenethylamine, can act as mild sexual stimulants. [2]
The uniform sheen and crisp bite of properly processed chocolate are the result of consistently small cocoa butter crystals produced by the tempering process. [2]

KEY TOPICS

Section Contents:

* Chocolate is also used in cold and hot beverages, to produce chocolate milk and hot cocoa.(More…)

* You may want to grab a bar or make a nice cup of hot cocoa before you begin exploring here.(More…)

* A recent BBC News article emphasized the connection between dark chocolate and low blood pressure.(More…)

Chocolate is also used in cold and hot beverages, to produce chocolate milk and hot cocoa. Chocolate contains alkaloids such as theobromine and phenethylamine which have physiological effects on the body. It has been linked to serotonin levels in the brain. [2] Vegetable oils and artificial vanilla flavor are often used in cheaper chocolate to mask poorly fermented and/or roasted beans. Currently, the FDA does not allow a product to be referred to as "chocolate" if the product contains any of these ingredients. [2] The different flavours of chocolate can be obtained by varying the time and temperature when roasting the beans, by adjusting the relative quantities of the cocoa solids and cocoa fat, and by adding non-chocolate ingredients. [2] Production costs can be decreased by reducing cocoa solid content or by substituting cocoa butter with a non-cocoa fat. Cocoa growers oppose allowing the resulting food to be called "chocolate", because that would lower demand for their crops. [2] Some mass-produced chocolate contains much less cocoa (as low as 7% in many cases) and fats other than cocoa butter. Some chocolate makers say that these "chocolate" products should not be classified as couvertures, or even as chocolate, because of the low or virtually non-existent cocoa content. [2] The earliest record of using chocolate pre-dates the Maya. In November, 2007, archeologists reported finding evidence of the oldest known cultivation and use of cacao at a site in Puerto Escondido, Honduras, dating from about 1100 to 1400 BC. The residues found and the kind of vessel they were found in, indicate that the initial use of cacao was not simply as a beverage, but the white pulp around the cacao beans was likely used as a source of fermentable sugars for an alcoholic drink. [2]

William Bright (personal communication cited in a 1977 article by Lyle Campbell ) noted that the word xocoatl does not occur in early Spanish or Nahuatl colonial sources. Chocolate has been used as a drink for nearly all of its history. [2]

A typical 25-gram (0.88 oz) baker's chocolate bar would be enough to bring about symptoms in a 20-kilogram (44 lb) dog. Of course, baking chocolate is rarely consumed directly due to its unpleasant taste, but other dark chocolates' canine toxicities may be extrapolated based on this figure. As dogs like the taste of chocolate products as much as humans do, and are capable of finding and eating quantities much larger than typical human servings, they should be kept out of their reach. [2] Chocolate most commonly comes in dark, milk, and white varieties, with cocoa solids contributing to the brown coloration. [2] Some manufacturers provide the percentage of chocolate in a finished chocolate confection as a label quoting percentage of " cocoa " or " cacao ". It should be noted that this refers to the combined percentage of both cocoa solids and cocoa butter in the bar, not just the percentage of cocoa solids. [2] Pure, unsweetened chocolate contains primarily cocoa solids and cocoa butter in varying proportions. [2] The uniform sheen and crisp bite of properly processed chocolate are the result of consistently small cocoa butter crystals produced by the tempering process. [2] F), which will allow crystal types IV and V to form (VI takes too long to form). At this temperature, the chocolate is agitated to create many small crystal "seeds" which will serve as nuclei to create small crystals in the chocolate. F) to eliminate any type IV crystals, leaving just the type V. After this point, any excessive heating of the chocolate will destroy the temper and this process will have to be repeated. [2] If refrigerated or frozen without containment, chocolate can absorb enough moisture to cause a whitish discoloration, the result of fat or sugar crystals rising to the surface. Moving chocolate from one temperature extreme to another, such as from a refrigerator on a hot day can result in an oily texture. Although visually unappealing, these conditions are perfectly safe for consumption. [2] Making good chocolate is about forming the most of the type V crystals. This provides the best appearance and texture and creates the most stable crystals so the texture and appearance will not degrade over time. To accomplish this, the temperature is carefully manipulated during the crystallization. [2]

According to the World Cocoa Foundation, some 50 million people around the world depend on cocoa as a source of livelihood. The industry is dominated by three chocolate makers, Barry Callebaut, Cargill and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and in the UK, 99.999% of chocolatiers, whether they be large companies such as Cadbury Schweppes or small independents, purchase their chocolate from them, to melt, mould and package to their own design. [2] The source of most chocolate marketed, forastero cocoas are typically strong in classic "chocolate" flavour, but have a short duration and are unsupported by secondary flavours, producing "quite bland" chocolate. There are exceptional forasteros, such as the "Nacional" or the "Arriba" varieties, which can be very complex flavors. [2] Processed cocoa powder (so called Dutch chocolate), processed with alkali greatly reduces the antioxidant capacity as compared to "raw" cocoa powder. [2]

In June of 2007, as a response to consumer concern after the proposed change, the FDA re-iterated that "Cacao fat, as one of the signature characteristics of the product, will remain a principal component of standardized chocolate". [2] Despite some disagreement in the EU about the definition, chocolate is any product made primarily of cocoa solids and cocoa fat. [2] Chocolate is also a calorie-rich food with a high fat content, so daily intake of chocolate also requires reducing caloric intake of other foods. [2] Chocolate, ranging from dark to light, can be molded and decorated like these chickens with ribbons. [2] Additionally chocolate should be stored in a dark place or protected from light by wrapping paper. [2]

Uncontrolled crystallization of cocoa butter typically results in crystals of varying size, some or all large enough to be clearly seen with the naked eye. This causes the surface of the chocolate to appear mottled and matte, and causes the chocolate to crumble rather than snap when broken. [2] While studies show that the lead consumed in chocolate may not all be absorbed by the human body, there is no known threshold for the effects of lead on children's brain function and even small quantities of lead can cause permanent neurodevelopmental deficits including impaired IQ. [2] Chocolate contains a variety of substances, some of which have an effect on body chemistry. [2] Various types of "blooming" effects can occur if chocolate is stored or served improperly. [2] Flavonoids can inhibit the development of diarrhea, suggesting antidiarrhoeal effects of chocolate. [2]

Several population studies have observed an increase in the risk of certain cancers among people who frequently consume sweet 'junk' foods such as chocolate. [2] Much of the chocolate consumed today is in the form of sweet chocolate, combining chocolate with sugar. [2]

Stirring solid chocolate into molten chocolate to "inoculate" the liquid chocolate with crystals (this method uses the already formed crystal of the solid chocolate to "seed" the molten chocolate). [2] Chocolate makers use harvested cacao beans and other ingredients to produce couverture chocolate. [2] Chocolatiers use the finished couverture to make chocolate candies (bars, truffles, baked goods, etc.). [2] Chocolate is a mild stimulant to humans mainly due to the presence of theobromine. It is much more potent for horses, and its use in horse racing is prohibited. [2]

Gifts of chocolate molded into different shapes have become traditional on certain holidays: chocolate bunnies and eggs are popular on Easter, coins on Hanukkah, Santa Claus and other holiday symbols on Christmas, and hearts on Valentine's Day. [2] The more expensive chocolates tend to be processed longer and thus have a smoother texture and "feel" on the tongue, regardless of whether emulsifying agents are added. Different manufacturers develop their own "signature" blends based on the above formulas but varying proportions of the different constituents are used. [2] Chocolate liquor is blended with the cocoa butter in varying quantities to make different types of chocolate or couvertures. [2] There are several mechanisms for removing cocoa butter from chocolate liquor. These include using hydraulic pressure and the Broma process. [2] In the United States, some large chocolate manufacturers lobbied the federal government to permit confection containing cheaper hydrogenated vegetable oil in place of cocoa butter to be sold as "chocolate". [2] Chocolate made with enough cocoa butter flows gently over a chocolate fountain to serve dessert fondue. [2] The nibs are ground which releases and melts the cocoa butter producing chocolate liquor. [2] The dried beans are transported from the plantation where they were grown to a chocolate manufacturing facility. [2] The three main varieties of cacao beans used in chocolate are criollo, forastero and trinitario. [2] Chocolate was also an important luxury good throughout pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and cacao beans were often used as currency. [2] Chocolate tempering machines (or temperers ) with computer controls can be used for producing consistently tempered chocolate, particularly for large volume applications. [2]

In sufficient amounts, the theobromine found in chocolate is toxic to non-human animals such as horses, dogs, parrots, small rodents, and cats ( kittens especially) because they are unable to metabolise the chemical effectively. If they are fed chocolate, the theobromine will remain in their bloodstream for up to 20 hours, and these animals may experience epileptic seizures, heart attacks, internal bleeding, and eventually death. [2] Producers of high quality, small batch chocolate argue that mass production produces bad quality chocolate. [2]

Working the molten chocolate on a heat-absorbing surface, such as a stone slab, until thickening indicates the presence of sufficient crystal "seeds"; the chocolate is then gently warmed to working temperature. [2] Ideally, chocolates are packed or wrapped, and placed in proper storage with the correct humidity and temperature. [2]

The word "chocolate" comes from the Aztecs of Mexico, and is derived from the Nahuatl word xocolatl (pronounced ), which is a combination of the words, xocolli, meaning "bitter", and atl, which is "water". [2] The Aztecs associated chocolate with Xochiquetzal, the goddess of fertility. [2]

Xocoatl was believed to fight fatigue, a belief that is probably attributable to the theobromine content. Other chocolate drinks combined it with such edibles as maize starch paste (which acts as an emulsifier and thickener), various fruits, and honey. [2] A review article published in a peer-reviewed journal in 2006 states that despite high consumption levels of chocolate, there is a paucity of data on lead concentrations in chocolate products. [2] Chocolate has one of the higher concentrations of lead among products that constitute a typical Westerner's diet, with a potential to cause mild lead poisoning. [2]

There is a popular belief that the consumption of chocolate can cause acne. Various studies seem to show that this is the case for high glycemic index foods in general, though the question is still being studied. [2] There are other methods of chocolate tempering used— the most common variant is introducing already tempered, solid "seed" chocolate. [2] Two-thirds of the fat in chocolate comes in the forms of a saturated fat called stearic acid and a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. [2] The length of the conching process determines the final smoothness and quality of the chocolate. [2] Romantic lore commonly identifies chocolate as an aphrodisiac. The reputed aphrodisiac qualities of chocolate are most often associated with the simple sensual pleasure of its consumption. It has been suggested that theobromine and other chemicals found in chocolate, most notably phenethylamine, can act as mild sexual stimulants. [2] A recent peer-reviewed publication found significant amounts of lead in chocolate. [2] A study reported by the BBC indicated that melting chocolate in one's mouth produced an increase in brain activity and heart rate that was more intense than that associated with passionate kissing, and also lasted four times as long after the activity had ended. [2] Chocolate should be stored away from other foods as it can absorb different aromas. [2] While there is no firm proof that chocolate is indeed an aphrodisiac, a gift of chocolate is a familiar courtship ritual. [2] Chocolates that are organic or fair trade certified carry labels accordingly. Manufacturers may also state whether their chocolate is shade grown. [2]

Recent studies have suggested that cocoa or dark chocolate may possess certain beneficial effects on human health. Dark chocolate, with its high cocoa content, is a rich source of the flavonoids epicatechin and gallic acid, which are thought to possess cardioprotective properties. [2] Cocoa or dark chocolate benefits the circulatory system. Other beneficial effects are suggested, such as anticancer, brain stimulator, cough preventor and antidiarrhoeal effects. [2] Unlike other saturated fats, stearic acid does not raise levels of LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream. Consuming relatively large amounts of dark chocolate and cocoa does not seem to raise serum LDL cholesterol levels; some studies even find that it could lower them. [2] Very little evidence exists to suggest whether consuming flavonoid-rich dark chocolate may increase or decrease the risk of cancer. Evidence from laboratory studies suggests that cocoa flavonoids may possess anticarcinogenic mechanisms, but more research is needed to prove this idea. [2]

The finest, plain dark chocolate couvertures contain at least 70% cocoa (solids + butter), whereas milk chocolate usually contains up to 50%. [2] " White chocolate " contains cocoa butter, sugar, and milk but no cocoa solids (and thus does not qualify to be considered true chocolate). [2]

Consuming milk chocolate or white chocolate, or drinking fat-containing milk with dark chocolate, appears largely to negate the health benefit. [2] A typical 20-kilogram (40-lb) dog will normally experience great intestinal distress after eating less than 240 grams (8.5 oz) of dark chocolate, but will not necessarily experience bradycardia or tachycardia unless it eats at least a half a kilogram (1.1 lb) of milk chocolate. [2] The major concern that nutritionists have is that even though eating dark chocolate may favorably affect certain biomarkers of cardiovascular disease, the amount needed to have this effect would provide a relatively large quantity of calories, which, if unused, would promote weight gain. [2]

There has even been a fad diet, named "Chocolate diet", that emphasizes eating chocolate and cocoa powder in capsules. [2] Besides, there are many potential beneficial effects on health of eating chocolate. [2] Part of the pleasure of eating chocolate is due to the fact that its melting point is slightly below human body temperature: it melts in the mouth. [2]

Small but regular amounts of dark chocolate lowers the possibility of heart attack, a result of cholesterol imbalance according to the lipid hypothesis. [2] Scientists claim that chocolate, eaten in moderation, can lower blood pressure. Dark chocolate has recently been promoted for its health benefits, including a substantial amount of antioxidants that reduce the formation of free radicals, though the presence of theobromine renders it toxic to some animals, such as dogs and cats. [2] Some studies have also observed a modest reduction in blood pressure and flow-mediated dilation after consuming approximately 100g of dark chocolate daily. [2]

Dark chocolate has 2 to 5 times more theobromine and thus is more dangerous to dogs. [2]

Milk chocolate is sweet chocolate that additionally contains milk powder or condensed milk [2] In 1689 noted physician and collector Hans Sloane, developed a milk chocolate drink in Jamaica which was initially used by apothecaries, but later sold by the Cadbury brothers. [2]

Chocolate is toxic to many animals because of insufficient metabolism ability. [2] High-quality chocolate is conched for about 72 hours, lesser grades about four to six hours. [2] The Spanish word that is the root of "chocolate" translates to "food of the gods." The name tells us a lot about how the Aztecs coveted this drink - it was enjoyed by royalty alone. It was also enjoyed in remarkable proportions: Montezuma is reported to have consumed fifty pitchers per day. [1] You wouldn't recognize the chocolate prepared by the Aztec people. It was a cold, bitter drink with a variety of spices, having a watery texture and served with a swizzle stick. [1]

Let our Twenty-four Piece Chocolate Collection Twenty-four Piece Chocolate Collection escort Mom on a journey through flavors like Local Blueberry Port and Chamomile Honey Caramel. Find this jewel and a king's ransom of others under the Chocolate Gift Chocolate Gift heading. [1] Please take a moment to browse our gourmet chocolate gourmet chocolate products available with a gift note or in a chocolate gift basket chocolate gift basket. [1] UPS helps Chocolate.com deliver chocolate truffles, Christmas chocolate Christmas chocolate and any other product that you may desire. [1] Where can mere mortals find such unabashed chocolate heaven? Perhaps only at Chocolate.com, the unique artisanal marketplace for real chocolatiers. [1] Need the perfect gift? Send chocolate Send chocolate with a gift note! We offer hundreds of chocolate gifts chocolate gifts that will make your loved one smile. [1] About a century after the Aztecs discovered chocolate, Royalty in Spain and France adopted the idea. [1]


You may want to grab a bar or make a nice cup of hot cocoa before you begin exploring here. This special online-only edition of Exploring takes a closer look at the sweet lure of chocolate. [6] We'll examine the fascinating — and often misreported — history of chocolate, follow the chocolate-making process, and take an online visit to a chocolate factory. We'll also look at the science of chocolate, and find out about the latest research into the possible health effects of its consumption. [6]

The role of the "chocolate amphetamine" is disputed. Most if not all chocolate-derived phenylethylamine is metabolised before it reaches the CNS. Some people may be sensitive to its effects in very small quantities. [7] Chocolate Chocolate contains small quantities of anandamide anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid cannabinoid found in the brain. [7] Cacao and chocolate bars contain a group of neuroactive alkaloids known as tetrahydro-beta-carbolines tetrahydro-beta-carbolines. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines are also found in beer, wine and liquor; they have been linked to alcoholism. The possible role of these chemicals in chocolate addiction remains unclear. [7] Chocolate psychoactive confectionery remains unlicensed. Chocolate as we know it today dates to the inspired addition of triglyceride cocoa butter by Swiss confectioner Rodolphe Lindt Rodolphe Lindt in 1879. The advantage of cocoa butter is that its addition to chocolate sets a bar so that it will readily snap and then melt on the tongue. [7] In the UK, chocolate bars laced with cannabis are popular with many victims of multiple sclerosis. This brand of psychoactive confectionery remains unlicensed. [7]

Like other palatable sweet foods, consumption of chocolate triggers the release of endorphins endorphins, the body's endogenous opiates endogenous opiates. [7] The Greek term theobroma means literally "food of the gods". Chocolate has also been called the food of the devil; but the theological basis of this claim is obscure. [7] Chocolate clearly delivers far more than a brief sugar high. Its cocktail of psychochemical effects in the central nervous system are poorly understood. [7] Sceptics claim one would need to consume several pounds of chocolate to gain any very noticeable psychoactive effects; and eat a lot more to get fully stoned. It's worth noting that N-oleolethanolamine and N-linoleoylethanolamine, two structural cousins of anandamide present in chocolate, both inhibit the metabolism of anandamide. It has been speculated that they promote and prolong the feeling of well-being induced by anandamide. [7]

Taken fermented as a drink, chocolate was also used in religious Chocolate itself was reserved for warriors, nobility and priests. The Aztecs esteemed its reputed ability to confer wisdom and vitality. Taken fermented as a drink, chocolate was also used in religious ceremonies. [7] Aztec taxation was levied in cacao beans. 100 cacao beans could buy a slave. 12 cacao beans bought the services of courtesan. The celebrated Italian libertine Giacomo Casanova Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798) took chocolate before bedding his conquests on account of chocolate's reputation as a subtle aphrodisiac. [7] Chocolate itself was reserved for warriors, nobility and priests. The Aztecs esteemed its reputed ability to confer wisdom and vitality. [7]

Coincidentally or otherwise, many of the worlds oldest supercentenarians supercentenarians, e.g. Jeanne Calment Jeanne Calment (1875-1997) and Sarah Knauss Sarah Knauss (1880-1999), were passionately fond of chocolate. Jeanne Calment habitually ate two pounds of chocolate per week until her physician induced her to give up sweets at the age of 119 - three years before her death aged 122. [7] More than 300 different constituent compounds in chocolate have been identified. [7] Reduced theta activity is associated with enhanced relaxation. This study needs replication. Perhaps chocolate theta activity in the brain. Reduced theta activity is associated with enhanced relaxation. This study needs replication. Perhaps chocolate's key ingredient is its phenylethylamine ( PEA PEA ) "love-chemical". [7]


A recent BBC News article emphasized the connection between dark chocolate and low blood pressure. Citing a study by The University of L'Aquila (L'Aquila, Italy), they also concluded that milk chocolate offers similar benefits to dark. A separate report by WCVB News (Boston) echoed these findings, giving the credit to an ingredient known as Flavonoids - found in all dark chocolate. [1] In a controlled experiment comparing 20 different people, researchers found that dark chocolate was a significant factor in lowering blood pressure, while white chocolate white chocolate was not. The key ingredient thought to cause this phenomenon is flavonoids. [1] A 2005 study based at Tufts University in Medford, MA found that dark chocolate dark chocolate actually helps to lower blood pressure. [1]

Moist and rich chocolate. Composition Book Box Composition Book Box - A perfect office gift, for teacher appreciation, Mother's Day and more! This composition book box is filled with AvenueSweets gourmet Dark Chocolate and Golden (vanilla) caramels. Once the treats are devoured, this sturdy and. [1] The health benefits of dark chocolate were discovered centuries ago by the Aztecs, a Mexican empire that thrived in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. [1] If you're just an average, everyday person with a sweet tooth, then you'll be interested to know that good things are contained in a single bite of dark chocolate. [1]


IN-DEPTH

Section Contents:

* Chocology Whatever your need, CHOCOLOGY can provide it: Chocolate in bars, baskets, boxes and gift-wrapped; Melt-in-the-mouth.(More…)

* Visit the Amazon rain forest and see cacao—the source of chocolate growing on the tree. - Learn about the early history of chocolate, its importance to early American cultures, and how it spread to Europe. - Take a video tour of Scharffen Berger Chocolate Makers factory. - Listen to scientists explain the chemical properties of chocolate.(More…)

* Candy bars, milk shakes, cookies, flavored coffee - even cereal and medicine!(More…)

* Just as a grapevine yields everything from crisp whites to spicy reds, the cacao bean delivers an intricate array of chocolates.(More…)

* Chocolate bars, chocolate fudge, chocolate cake, chocolate chip cookies, chocolate ice cream, chocolate milk, chocolate cereal, hot chocolate, chocolate sauce.(More…)

* Each solid chocolate pig combines applewood smoked bacon, Alder wood smoked salt and deep milk chocolate.(More…)

* Halloween was followed by Christmas totaling $1.435 billion, Easter totaling $1.856 billion, and Valentine's Day totaling $1.059 billion in sales.(More…)

* Take a delicious journey!(More…)

* The essential ingredient in all chocolate is cocoa, which is made from the cream-colored beans that grow in pods on a tree with the botanical name Theobroma cacao.(More…)

* At Lutheran World Relief, we believe in leading by example.(More…)

* ExtremeChocolate.com is being created for chocolate lovers — by chocolate lovers.(More…)

* A beautifully sculpted chocolate shell conceals a center of filling which explodes with a surprising texture and flavor in your mouth.(More…)

* The first pie I tasted was actually baked by my mom.(More…)

* Our specialties include the famous Five Star gourmet chocolate bars Five Star gourmet chocolate bars, chocolate truffles, Belgian dark chocolate, Vermont chocolate Vermont chocolate and Vermont gifts Vermont gifts, gourmet hot chocolate gourmet hot chocolate, wedding chocolates, and our ever-popular Chocolate of the Month Club.(More…)

* Chocolate Museum Jacques Chocolate Museum Jacques (Eupen) Information on how chocolate is made, through films and presentations.(More…)

Chocology Whatever your need, CHOCOLOGY can provide it: Chocolate in bars, baskets, boxes and gift-wrapped; Melt-in-the-mouth. [8] Need a judge for your next chocolate event? The Chocolate Muse Chocolate Muse herself is qualified and ready! Fill out the guest book guest book to find out more. [8] Send virtual chocolate treats, grab some wallpapers, or find real chocolate worldwide. [8]

Cowgirl Chocolates These award winning truffles are sweet and delicate at first bite, with a hot and spicy kick that appeals to the adventurous. [8]


Visit the Amazon rain forest and see cacao—the source of chocolate growing on the tree. - Learn about the early history of chocolate, its importance to early American cultures, and how it spread to Europe. - Take a video tour of Scharffen Berger Chocolate Makers factory. - Listen to scientists explain the chemical properties of chocolate. [9]

In 2007, a UK study suggested that eating dark chocolate was more rewarding than passionate kissing kissing. More research is needed to replicate this result. [7] Indeed a whole ounce of milk chocolate contains no more caffeine than a typical cup of "decaffeinated" coffee. Chocolate's theobromine coffee. Chocolate's theobromine content may contribute to - but seems unlikely to determine - its subtle but distinctive psychoactive profile. Surprisingly, perhaps, recent research suggests that pure theobromine may be superior to opiates as a cough medicine due to its action on the vagus nerve. [7] Endorphins probably contribute to the warm inner glow induced in susceptible chocoholics. Acute monthly cravings for chocolate amongst pre-menstrual women may be partly explained by its rich magnesium magnesium content. [7]


Candy bars, milk shakes, cookies, flavored coffee - even cereal and medicine! Chocolate is a key ingredient in many foods. It ranks as the favorite flavor of most Americans. Yet, few of us know the unique origins of this popular treat. [3] Learn the differences between bittersweet and baking, milk and white, and dark and dutched chocolate. [3]

The journey from seed to sweet is a long one, spanning many centuries and requiring many processes. Growing Chocolate Growing Chocolate Fascinated by chocolate's origins? Explore the rainforest habitat of the cacao tree, discover the different ways it can be grown, and learn about this amazing plant's many unusual characteristics. The History of Chocolate The History of Chocolate Curious about who discovered chocolate? Meet the people who first used cacao, then view their tools and explore their traditions. [3] Making Chocolate Making Chocolate Interested in how chocolate is produced today? Investigate key inventions in the manufacturing and molding process of chocolate candy. [3]


Just as a grapevine yields everything from crisp whites to spicy reds, the cacao bean delivers an intricate array of chocolates. [10]

The Darkest Chocolate Happens At Midnight. Ghirardelli Intense Dark introduces the luxuriously deep and velvety 86% cacao dark chocolate delivering the ultimate chocolate intensity. [11] Read Story of Chocolate Story of Chocolate and Cacao Cacao to learn about how beans become chocolate. [12] The cacao paste is mixed with sugar and cooked at a high temperature to make chocolate. [12] Many candies and desserts contain chocolate. People often give chocolate as a gift on holidays such as Valentine's Day and Halloween. [12]

More Chocolate Sites All About Chocolate All About Chocolate http://www.fabulousfoods.com/school/csingred/chocolate.html http://www.fabulousfoods.com/school/csingred/chocolate.html Here you find a brief description of the tempering process and information on proper storage of chocolate. [12] Story of Chocolate Story of Chocolate from the Chocolate Manufacturers Association, National Confectioners Association http://www.candyusa.org/chocstry.html http://www.candyusa.org/chocstry.html Until 1492, the Old World knew nothing at all about the delicious and stimulating flavor that was to become the favorite of millions. [12]

Find out about chocolate and acne, antioxidants, caffeine, cravings, tooth decay, nutrients, weight control, or cocoa butter. [12] Try Cadbury Maths in the Factory Cadbury Maths in the Factory website to find out how math is used in making chocolate. [12]

Hershey Foods Corporation Hershey Foods Corporation http://www.hersheys.com/index.shtml http://www.hersheys.com/index.shtml Hershey chocolate is very popular. [12] Explore the History of Chocolate History of Chocolate website to learn about the history of chocolate, then create a timeline showing the important dates in Chocolate history. [12]

Early explorers brought chocolate to Europe. It was later brought to North America. During World War II, soldiers got chocolate candy bars as part of their rations. Chocolate at About.com http://home.about.com/food/hubsearch.htm?SUNamefood&termschocolate+resources This is a links-site that connects you to lots of chocolate resources. [12] Visit several of the commercial chocolate sites like Hershey Hershey, Mars Mars, and Ghirardelli. [12]

Until 1492, the Old World knew nothing at all about the delicious and stimulating flavor that was to become the favorite of millions. The Court of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella got its first look at the principal ingredient of chocolate when Columbus returned in triumph from America and laid before the Spanish throne a treasure trove of many strange and wonderful things. Among these were a few dark brown beans that looked like almonds and seemed most unpromising. [13] All chocolate manufacturers, it is important to note, must meet the standards as set forth in the rules and regulations of The Food and Drug Administration. These govern manufacturing formulas, even to the extent of specifying the minimum content of the chocolate liquor and milk used. They also impose strict rules regarding the flavorings and other ingredients that may be used. [13] Manufacturing methods will differ in detail from plant to plant, but there is a general processing pattern which prevails everywhere. It is this pattern that makes the chocolate industry distinctive from every other industry. All manufacturers carefully catalogue each shipment according to its particular type and origin. This is very important, because it enables them later to maintain exact control over the flavor blending of beans for roasting. [13] The process generates temperatures as high as 125 degrees Fahrenheit, which kill the germ of the bean and activate existing enzymes in the beans to form compounds that produce the chocolate flavor when the beans are roasted. [13] Fermentation lasts from three to nine days and serves to remove the raw bitter taste of cocoa and to develop precursors and components that are characteristic of chocolate flavor. [13] The fruit, which will eventually be converted into the world's chocolate and cocoa, has green or sometimes maroon colored pods on the trunk of the tree and its main branches. Shaped somewhat like an elongated melon tapered at both ends, these pods often ripen into a golden color or sometimes take on a scarlet hue with multicolored flecks. At its maturity, the cultivated tree measures from 15 to 25 feet tall, though the tree in its wild state may reach 60 feet or more. [13] When the liquid is poured into molds and allowed to solidify, the resulting cakes are unsweetened or bitter chocolate. Up to this point, the manufacturing of cocoa and chocolate is identical. [13]

The fat drains away through metallic screens as a yellow liquid. It is then collected for use in chocolate manufacturing. Cocoa butter has such importance for the chocolate industry that it deserves more than a passing mention. It is unique among vegetable fats because it is a solid at normal room temperature and melts at 89 to 93 degrees Fahrenheit, which is just below body temperature. Its success in resisting oxidation and rancidity makes it very practical. [13] For convenience, chocolate is frequently shipped in a liquid state when intended for use by other food manufacturers. Whether solid or liquid, it provides candy, cookie, and ice cream manufacturers with the most popular flavor for their products. [13] The process generates enough frictional heat to liquefy the cocoa butter and form what is commercially know as chocolate liquor. [13] The by-product of cocoa shortly becomes an essential component of chocolate. That component is the unique vegetable fat, cocoa butter, which forms about 25 percent of the weight of most chocolate bars. [13] Besides enhancing the flavor, the added cocoa butter serves to make the chocolate more fluid. [13] The "conches," as the machines are called, are equipped with heavy rollers that plow back and forth through the chocolate mass anywhere from a few hours to several days. Under regulated speeds, these rollers can produce different degrees of agitation and aeration in developing and modifying the chocolate flavors. [13] Under the grinding that takes place here, the mixture is refined to a smooth paste ready for "conching." Conching is a flavor development process which puts the chocolate through a "kneading" action and takes its name from the shell-like shape of the containers originally employed. [13]

Exposure to air quickly changes the cream-colored beans to a lavender or purple. They do not look like the finished chocolate nor do they have the well-known fragrance of chocolate at this time. [13] Depending upon the variety of the beans and the desired end result, the roasting lasts from 30 minutes to two hours at temperatures of 250 degrees Fahrenheit and higher. As the beans turn over and over, their moisture content drops, their color changes to a rich brown, and the characteristic aroma of chocolate becomes evident. [13] In the science of chocolate making, much depends upon the ability to achieve the right formula for the desired end product through the proper selection of beans available. [13] To bring out the characteristic chocolate aroma, the beans are roasted in large rotary cylinders. [13] Dried beans from an average pod weigh less than two ounces, and approximately 400 beans are required to make one pound of chocolate. [13]

The hand methods of manufacture used by small shops gave way in time to the mass production of chocolate. [13] In the United States of America, the production of chocolate proceeded at a faster pace than anywhere else in the world. It was in the pre-revolutionary New England — 1765, to be exact — that the first chocolate factory was established. Chocolate has gained so much importance since that time, that any interruption in its supply would be keenly felt. [13] In some manufacturing setups, there is an emulsifying operation that either takes the place of conching or else supplements it. This operation is carried out by a machine that works like an eggbeater to break up sugar crystals and other particles in the chocolate mixture to give it a fine, velvety smoothness. [13] A portion of the United State's total chocolate output goes into coatings, powders and flavorings that add zest to our foods in a thousand different ways. [13] During World War II, the U.S. government recognized chocolate's role in the nourishment and group spirit of the Allied Armed Forces, so much so that it allocated valuable shipping space for the importation of cocoa beans. Many soldiers were thankful for the pocket chocolate bars which gave them the strength to carry on until more food rations could be obtained. [13] Just to make an individual-size chocolate bar, for instance, takes from two to four days or more. [13] Besides the equipment already described, the industry employs a number of fascinating machines to do the work of shaping and packaging chocolate into the familiar forms that we see every day on store counters. [13]

The chocolate liquor, destined to become a cup of cocoa, is pumped into giant hydraulic presses weighing up to 25 tons, where pressure is applied to remove the desired cocoa butter. [13] By 1730, chocolate had dropped in price from three dollars or more per pound to within the financial reach of all. [13] We now come to the remarkable art of chocolate making, a process that is comparable with the skill and finesse of the world's greatest chefs. [13] When the molded chocolate reaches the cooling chamber, cooling proceeds at a fixed rate that keeps hard-earned flavor intact. [13] From then on, drinking chocolate had more of the smooth consistency and the pleasing flavor it has today. [13]

Some of the shaping machines perform at amazing speeds, squirting out jets of chocolate that solidify into special shapes at a rate of several hundred a minute. Other machines do a complete job of wrapping and packaging at speeds that human hands would find impossible. [13] The 19 th Century marked two more revolutionary developments in the history of chocolate. [13] The equipment of a factory is heavy, massive and complex. Often representing an investment of many millions of dollars, there are literally tons of equipment that the cocoa beans must pass through on their way to becoming chocolate. [13] You can see the name of Roux's boat during the movie- "Reine Tora". Continuity: When Roux enters the chocolate shop the first time, Vianne hands him a chocolate to try. If you lived in this village, you understood what was expected of you. [14]


Chocolate bars, chocolate fudge, chocolate cake, chocolate chip cookies, chocolate ice cream, chocolate milk, chocolate cereal, hot chocolate, chocolate sauce. [15] The beans are fermented for about a week, dried in the sun sun and then shipped to the chocolate maker. In the next sections, we'll look at how the chocolate maker turns these raw beans into luscious chocolate. [15]


Each solid chocolate pig combines applewood smoked bacon, Alder wood smoked salt and deep milk chocolate. [10] Each American eats almost 12 pounds of chocolate per year. There are many different types of chocolate such as milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and white chocolate. The Mayan people were some of the first to grow large plantations of cacao as early as 600AD. Both the Maya and Aztec people used cacao as a form of money. [12] You'll learn how chocolate is made the Maya, Aztec, Spanish, and contemporary way. Eating Chocolate Eating Chocolate Craving more of your favorite indulgence? Immerse yourself in the lure and lore of chocolate and investigate its use as a health remedy, an alleged aphrodisiac, and a seasoning in recipes from around the world. [3] Just for Kids Just for Kids Looking for chocolate fun for the whole family? Download kid-friendly recipes, fun facts, crossword puzzles, word finds, and other educational activities. [3]


Halloween was followed by Christmas totaling $1.435 billion, Easter totaling $1.856 billion, and Valentine's Day totaling $1.059 billion in sales. In the Gallup survey taken in 1998 43% of U. S. adults said their favorite flavor was chocolate. [16] While cocoa is made by removing some of the cocoa butter, eating chocolate is made by adding it. This holds true of all eating chocolate, whether it is dark, bittersweet, or milk chocolate. [13] One example of eating chocolate is sweet chocolate, a combination of unsweetened chocolate, sugar, cocoa butter and perhaps a little vanilla. [13]

In 1847, an English company introduced solid "eating chocolate" through the development of fondant chocolate, a smooth and velvety variety that has almost completely replaced the old coarse grained chocolate which formerly dominated the world market. The second development occurred in 1876 in Vevey, Switzerland, when Daniel Peter devised a way of adding milk to the chocolate, creating the product we enjoy today known as milk chocolate. [13] Milk chocolate, the most common form of eating chocolate, goes through essentially the same mixing process-except that it involves using less unsweetened chocolate and adding milk. [13]


Take a delicious journey! Take a delicious journey! This handsome gift-and-go pack includes five chocolate bars chosen for their ability to pair beautifully with red wine, a decorative tasting placemat to write your personal tasting notes, and a handy guide to hosting your tasting party, from choosing the wine to setting the table, and some tasting words and ideas to get you started. [17] "Our findings indicate that milk may interfere with the absorption of antioxidants from chocolate. and may therefore negate the potential health benefits that can be derived from eating moderate amounts of dark chocolate." [18] In the second study, Serafini's team signed up seven healthy women and five healthy men aged 25-35. On different days they each ate 100 grams of dark chocolate by itself, 100 grams of dark chocolate with a small glass of whole milk, or 200 grams of milk chocolate. An hour later, those who ate dark chocolate alone had the most total antioxidants in their blood. They had higher levels of epicatechin, a particularly healthy compound found in chocolate. [18] Dark chocolate — but not milk chocolate or dark chocolate eaten with milk — is a potent antioxidant, report Mauro Serafini, PhD, of Italy's National Institute for Food and Nutrition Nutrition Research in Rome, and colleagues. Their report appears in the Aug. 28 issue of Nature. [18] Studies in two prestigious scientific journals say dark chocolate — but not white chocolate or milk chocolate — is good for you. [18] Half the patients got dark chocolate and half got white chocolate. Those who ate dark chocolate had a significant drop in blood pressure (by an average of 5 points for systolic and an average of 2 points for diastolic blood pressure). Those who ate white chocolate did not. [18] Dark chocolate — not white chocolate — lowers high blood pressure, say Dirk Taubert, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the University of Cologne, Germany. Their report appears in the Aug. 27 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. That's no license to go on a chocolate binge. [18] Eating more dark chocolate can help lower blood pressure — if you've reached a certain age and have mild high blood pressure, say the researchers. [18]

If health is your excuse for eating chocolate, remember the word "moderate" as you nibble. [18] Spanish monks, who had been consigned to process the cocoa beans, finally let the secret out. It did not take long before chocolate was acclaimed throughout Europe as a delicious, health-giving food. [4] It was the first time citizens of the United States were introduced to bonbons, chocolate creams, hard candies (called "boiled sweets"), and caramels. Members of the Basle Mission in Ghana encourage the growth of this emerging crop, and small to medium farmers turn Ghana into one of the most important producers. [4] By 1730, chocolate had dropped in price from three dollars or more per pound to within financial reach of all. [4] Scientists have isolated phenylethylamine (PEA) which is a stimulant found in chocolate, and also in the brain. [4] The judgment: "Liquidum non frangit jejunum," reiterated that a chocolate drink did not break the fast. [4] The Marquis de Sade, became proficient in using chocolate to disguise poisons! Casanova was reputed for using chocolate with champagne to seduce the ladies. Madame du Barry, reputed to be nymphomaniacal, encouraged her lovers to drink chocolate in order to keep up with her. London Chocolate Houses became the trendy meeting places where the elite London society savored their new luxury. [4]

"Tree," and the word chocolate comes from the Maya word xocoatl which means bitter water. [4] 1/3 is consumed by the Spaniards. As cocoa plantations spread to the tropics in both hemispheres by the 19th century, the increased production lowered the price of the cocoa beans and chocolate became a popular and affordable beverage. [4] We all wish chocolate health food would become the new rage, but unfortunately that doesn't seem likely to happen — or does it? Remember, chocolate comes from plants. [19] Let's face it: chocolate lovers crave chocolate. That's why we call ourselves chocolate lovers! But no matter how much we talk about chocolate's health benefits, we all know the truth: chocolate is okay. [19] Join us, and we'll explore the reality of a favorite choco-treat that's so extreme that it is, in fact, not really chocolate at all. [19]

Chocolate contains high amounts of antioxidants (approximately eight times the amount found in strawberries) and flavonoids, which can help reduce blood pressure. [19] When we talk about chocolate makeup, we don't mean those mint-chocolate lipsmackers you buy in the drug store! In the past, chocolate makeup has usually meant a cheap concoction smelling of poorly made sweets. These days, however, chocolate makeup has become a worldwide phenomenon — not to mention something no true chocolate lover can do without. [19] We like to think of ourselves as rather adventuresome here at X-Choc, but even we shudder at the thought of chocolate allergies. We hate to even mention the possibility, but as chocolate lovers, you need to understand both the good and the bad about your favorite snack. Not that chocolate itself is necessarily bad; it's how your body responds to one or more of its ingredients that may cause an allergic reaction. [19] Continue reading Chocolate Health: Working Chocolate into a Healthy Lifestyle. [19] Because they're such good people, kindly chocolatiers have recently introduced excellent low calorie, low carb chocolate for the diabetics and Atkins dieters among us. Don't scoff — your old pal Pete can testify that it's scrumptious. It does have its perils, and that's what I'll tell you about in this particular article. [19] Chocolate Chip Cookies: 27 Tips for Creating the Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie Chocolate Chip Cookies: 27 Tips for Creating the Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie Exactly what you need to know to create out-of-this-world chocolate chip cookies. [19]


The essential ingredient in all chocolate is cocoa, which is made from the cream-colored beans that grow in pods on a tree with the botanical name Theobroma cacao. [5] The next stage in chocolate manufacture involves cooling the liquid under controlled conditions to allow the fat, which holds all the solid sugar and cocoa particles together, to set in a crystalline form that has a smooth texture and appealing appearance. [5] "If you made a chocolate drink from ground-up cocoa, a lot of the fat would rise to the top of the drink and it would look ghastly," explains Stephen T. Beckett, departmental head at Nestlé Nestlé Product Technology Centre, York, England, and author of "The Science of Chocolate" (Cambridge, U.K.: Royal Society of Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry, 2000). [5] The rate at which chocolate sets, the texture and color of the product, and its melting properties depend on the percentage of cocoa butter and milk fats in the mixture. [5] For molded products, the fat must also contract on cooling so that the solid chocolate can be removed from the mold. [5] Migration of fat and moisture from caramel, peanuts, wafers, or other ingredients at the center of a confection through chocolate leads to deterioration of the product quality, Beckett points out. [5] Chocolate is a food that contains a range of nutrients—including not only fats and sugar, but also other carbohydrates and proteins. Chocolate contains small quantities of salts of metals such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, and iron; the vitamin riboflavin; the stimulant caffeine; and water. [5] Viscosity, flow properties, and particle size are therefore important factors in chocolate manufacture. Fat content is a key consideration in determining these properties and, according to Beckett, can have a dramatic impact on viscosity. Increasing fat content of chocolate from 27% to 28% can halve its viscosity. Chocolate viscosity can also be reduced by adding a small amount of an emulsifier, such as lecithin, a naturally occurring surface-active agent. [5] The rate of migration is largely determined by the temperature and humidity of the air around the chocolate and also by the moisture content of the chocolate and the type of fat present in the other components. [5]

The beans are then roasted. This process makes the bean shells brittle, darkens the color of the beans, and converts the beans' flavor precursors into the aldehydes, esters, lactones, pyrazines, and other groups of compounds that give chocolate its distinctive flavor and aroma. [5] The growers allow the beans to ferment for several days in order to develop the chemical precursors of the chocolate flavor. [5] The beans are then dried and transported to chocolate factories. At the factory, the cured beans are sorted and impurities such as sand and plant materials are removed. [5]

Sugar substitutes are used for low-calorie products. During processing, chocolate spends much of its time as a liquid. [5] Although the preparation of top-quality chocolate products may be regarded as an art form, modern processes for manufacturing the most popular brands rely heavily on science and technology. [5]

Polyphenols exhibit antioxidant activity. They have, for example, been shown to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and may therefore help to protect against cardiovascular disease. Chocolate, regardless of its nutritional benefits, is a pleasure to eat. I'm even tempted, at this moment, to reward myself with a bar of the luscious stuff. [5] The nibs are then ground into chocolate liquor—a thick brown liquid that solidifies at about room temperature. [5]


At Lutheran World Relief, we believe in leading by example. That's why, to support the Fair Trade cocoa farmers of Kuapa Kokoo in Ghana, we became an owner of Divine Chocolate — the first farmer-owned brand of chocolate in the world. [20] You may read that chocolate is an aphrodisiac based on studies from reputable universities. [4] There's a mocha fudge sauce sitting in my pantry that I'd love to use, and amazing toppings could include fruit, marshmallows, chocolate shavings, chocolate chips, candy and peanut butter. I'm sure you can order them on the internet as well, but the most appetizing ones I found were on this web site this web site, which is based abroad. [21] I know it sounds like a new music sensation that's sweeping the nation, but Hot Fudge Salsa is actually a recipe I found in Gentlemen, Start Your Ovens, by Tucker Shaw (Shaw also wrote Everything I Ate, a book where he photographed and wrote about every single meal he had for a year). It has "salsa" in the title, but this involves ice cream, chocolate, and peanuts. [21] I pulled out my cookie tome yesterday - Carole Walter's Great Cookies: Secrets to Sensational Sweets - and went for the aptly-named Carole's Really Great Chocolate Chip Cookies. (I know, the name sounds like a cop-out - until you realize that these are in addition to the "Soft and Chewy Choc. [21] Even moving past canned macaroons, I'm not typically a big fan of Passover desserts. These kosher for Passover chocolate cupcakes kosher for Passover chocolate cupcakes with chocolate cream cheese frosting, however, are so tasty that I could eat them year round. They are extremely rich - almost like fudge - so if you have mini cupcake wrappers, you might consider using those instead of normal-sized ones. [21]

There are far more people making chocolate products than there are colors to go around. [21] Montresor, the Chinese chocolate maker that was copying Ferrero Rocher, was ordered not only to stop but also to pay a token fine of €50,000. A lot of people see this as welcome news. It could mean that China may be ready to adopt more fair marketing practices. [21]

It'll run you 34 Euros, which is great for the Europeans, but not so great for us Yanks, as long as the exchange rate is all out of whack. Alas, the pillow is not actually made of chocolate - in fact, it's 100% polyester - but I suggest nibbling on a corner seam just to make absolutely sure. What's that? You say you're not a chocolate fan? BMC has you covered - they also carry a pillow covered in a pastel macaroon print, and one for the gummy candy lovers. [21] Some foods taste great but they don't exactly have names that instill confidence that they'll taste great. Other foods have a name that just makes you want to bite into the letters, and Banana Chocolate Chip Muffins is such a food. This recipe is from the always fun Cooking For 2 blog Cooking For 2 blog. You can make these muffins even if you find yourself alone on a Friday night ( especially if you find yourself alone on a Friday night). [21] VF found a Cooks Illustrated recipe for Chocolate-Chunk Oatmeal Cookies with Pecans and Dried Cherries, and smartly subbed the M&Ms for the cherry and chocolate pieces, but kept in the pecans. [21]


ExtremeChocolate.com is being created for chocolate lovers — by chocolate lovers. It's for people who have a passion for chocolate. [19] Lake Champlain Chocolates has been making fresh, all-natural gourmet chocolates and chocolate gifts gourmet chocolates and chocolate gifts for 25 years. [22] Beckett tells C&EN that cocoa contains around 800 chemical compounds. They include a group of polyphenolic compounds known as flavanols or catechins. A 40-g (about 1 oz.) milk chocolate bar contains around 300 mg of these compounds, a relatively high amount compared with most other polyphenol-containing foods. [5] Dark chocolate is made by mixing the separated cocoa butter with chocolate liquor and sugar. The same ingredients plus dried milk are used to make milk chocolate. [5] White chocolate contains cocoa butter, sugar, milk, but no chocolate liquor. [5] Eating chocolate typically contains between 25 and 35% fat and 50% sugar. Flavorings such as vanilla may also be added, depending on the product. [5] The concentration of fat in the liquor is too high for making cocoa powder and too low for making so-called eating chocolate. [5] The trick is to remove about half of the cocoa butter from the liquor using heavy-duty presses and use the butter for making eating chocolate. [5]

Chocolate's varied flavors, colors, shapes, and textures result from different recipe traditions that have evolved in different parts of the world. [5]


A beautifully sculpted chocolate shell conceals a center of filling which explodes with a surprising texture and flavor in your mouth. Many chocolatiers still make their pralines by hand. [23] The 2nd annual Choco-late Festival in Bruges will take place April 6 - 10, 2007. Visitors to the festival will have the privilege of tasting, experiencing and appreciating chocolate in all its forms & facets. [23] Belgian chocolate has been the food of champions, a lure for lovers, the indulgence of the rich and later, the favorite of the masses. [23] Taste Belgian pralines from different chocolate makers! Brussels-on-Stage is an exhibit-performance that invites the visitor to discover our fair capital city. (Groups only: Min. 15 pax / Max. 30). [23] Every town and even small villages have chocolate stores with luxurious pralines. [23] The interactive demonstration focuses on the origin and history of Belgian chocolate. [23] Musee de la Patisserie Musee de la Patisserie (Harze - Aywaille) In the unique setting of a castle, discover the history of bread, cookies and chocolate. [23]


The first pie I tasted was actually baked by my mom. She used nutella nutella for "sauce" and topped it with white chocolate shavings, but clearly there are infinite variations worth trying. [21] This page and all contents of this Web site are Copyright 1989 - 2008 BELGIAN CHOCOLATE ONLINE Inc. a Division of CANDYWORLD USA Inc. [24] I've tried it, and while I can stand baker's chocolate I really find that I get a lot more sense of the chocolate flavor when the bitterness is cut with some sugar. With that said, the point of this page is to give my critical appraisal of all the chocolate I can get my hands on. Some of the best stuff is hard to find, but well worth it if you share this particular passion with me. [25] I have provided some other information relating to chocolate in general that I think people might find interesting. [25]

The higher percentage of cocoa solids or cocoa liquor the better. Lucky for me, the market is rich with ultra-strong chocolates these days, a situation which just wasn't true two or three years ago. Sadly, real life keeps me too busy to do many reviews these days, but I do expect someday to put up reviews of some of those ultra- strong products. [25] Darkness works only to a point, of course. Sandra Boynton in her book Chocolate: The Consuming Passion advocates learning to like unsweetened baker's chocolate. Doing so has the advantage that no one will ask you to share it with them more than once. [25]


Our specialties include the famous Five Star gourmet chocolate bars Five Star gourmet chocolate bars, chocolate truffles, Belgian dark chocolate, Vermont chocolate Vermont chocolate and Vermont gifts Vermont gifts, gourmet hot chocolate gourmet hot chocolate, wedding chocolates, and our ever-popular Chocolate of the Month Club. [22]

New! Mother's Day Chocolate Bar Box Chocolate bars in a Mother's Day gift box. [26] Wedding Bar Box Sweet candy bar treats for the newlyweds. A delicious chocolate wedding gift box. [26]

New! Commencement Gift Box Show how proud you are - with premium chocolate. [26] Personalized Chocolate Gifts - World's Finest Chocolate Please note that Cookies and JavaScript are required for you to view this website. [26]


Chocolate Museum Jacques Chocolate Museum Jacques (Eupen) Information on how chocolate is made, through films and presentations. [23]

A whole sweet juicy Piemont cherry soaked in luscious cherry brandy liqueur and then encased in Ferrero's famous dark chocolate. [24] Two, I know the difference between great chocolate, good chocolate and mediocre chocolate (whether there is any "bad" chocolate is, in my mind, an unresolved issue). [25]


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1. Chocolate, Chocolate Gifts, Gourmet Chocolate, Chocolate Truffles, Gift, Easter
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2. Chocolate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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3. Chocolate - All About Chocolate
http://www.fieldmuseum.org/Chocolate/about.html

4. Chocolate History
http://www.chocolatemonthclub.com/chocolatehistory.htm

5. Chemical & Engineering News: WHAT'S THAT STUFF? - CHOCOLATE
http://pubs.acs.org/cen/whatstuff/stuff/7849sci5.html

6. Exploratorium Magazine: Chocolate
http://www.exploratorium.edu/exploring/exploring_chocolate/

7. Psychoactive food : chocolate
http://www.chocolate.org/

8. Virtual Chocolate - Mouthwatering Chocolate E-Postcards, Chocolate Locator, Chocoholic Club, Wallpapers and More!
http://www.virtualchocolate.com/

9. The Sweet Science of Chocolate!
http://www.exploratorium.edu/chocolate/

10. Chocolate Gifts, Gourmet Truffles & Specialty Recipes at Vosges Haut-Chocolat
http://www.vosgeschocolate.com/

11. Ghirardelli :: Home
http://www.ghirardelli.com/

12. Chocolate
http://42explore.com/choclat.htm

13. The History of Chocolate
http://www.karachocolates.com/chochist.html

14. Chocolat (2000)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0241303/

15. Howstuffworks "How Chocolate Works"
http://www.howstuffworks.com/chocolate.htm

16. Chocolate Intro
http://www.mce.k12tn.net/chocolate/index.htm

17. Welcome to Theo Chocolate
http://www.theochocolate.com/

18. Dark Chocolate Is Healthy Chocolate
http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20030827/dark-chocolate-is-healthy-chocolate

19. Extreme Chocolate
http://www.extremechocolate.com/

20. Fair Trade Chocolate Project - Lutheran World Relief
http://www.lwr.org/chocolate/index.asp

21. Posts from the Chocolate Category at Slashfood
http://www.slashfood.com/category/chocolate/

22. Mothers Day Chocolates, Mothers Day Gift Ideas, Gourmet Chocolate, Vermont Chocolate Truffles
http://www.lakechamplainchocolates.com/

23. Belgian Tourist Office - official website - Chocolate
http://www.visitbelgium.com/chocolate.htm

24. Belgian Chocolate Online
http://www.chocolat.com/

25. cloister's chocolate review page
http://www.hhhh.org/cloister/chocolate/

26. Personalized Chocolate Gifts - World's Finest Chocolate
http://www.worldsfinestchocolate.com/

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